5 Healthy Alternatives to Common Snack Types

Snacking is now commonly associated with poor eating habits. Mention the word “snacks” and the first thing we think of are foods loaded with saturated fats and high levels of sugar…potato chips, ice-cream, soft drinks – the list continues. But we all know that the healthiest way to eat, is little and often.  Snacking doesn’t need to be unhealthy or bad for you – we all just need to be better at choosing the right foods to eat.  In this infographic provided by Prep Perfect, you will see a list of healthy alternatives to 5 of the most common snacks:

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Your Guide to Farmers Markets in Portland

PortlandFarmersMarkets

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Dating back to 1730 and originating in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, folks have been buying fresh and local goods from farmer’s markets.

Farmers’ markets are popular worldwide and most often reflect the local culture of their surrounding areas. These bastions of deliciousness offer a myriad of treats from meat and vegetables to cooking demonstrations and fun foodie events. Here farmers and many others sell their goods directly to consumers.

These markets are growing rapidly across the United States. The USDA stated that the number of farmers markets in the United States increased 68 percent over the last 15 years, from 5,000 markets in 2008 to 8,411 in 2015.

What are the Economic Benefits of Farmer’s Markets?

Did you know that farmer’s markets impact more than just their shoppers? They have been shown to affect the local economy as well. The increase of a vendor’s personal income and increased job creation are just some of the contributing factors. For example, vendors at farmers’ markets are liable to see increased profits by selling products to the local community than by selling them to a wholesaler.

According to the USDA, “When food is produced, processed, distributed and sold all within the same region, more money stays in the local economy.  This leads to economic development and job creation.  Farmers markets provide opportunities for small farmers and businesses to sell their products, and they help meet the growing demand for locally produced food.  Being able to quickly and directly market to the consumer gives farmers important income opportunities without the added costs of shipping, storage and inventory control.”

Why Do People Flock to Farmers Markets?

It’s all about consumer demand. More and more people want to purchase food that is both healthy and sustainable. The desire for fresh produce, meats, dairy and more, free of additives and chemicals, has been increasing for decades. This is in part due to the public wanting to increase their personal health, increase the positive ecological impact of sustainability, and their awareness of how industrial agriculture can negatively impact human health and the environment as a whole.

Sustainable.org lists even more reasons why people buy sustainably:

  • To save family farms
  • Promote animal welfare
  • Protect and support rural communities
  • Empower and protect workers

Your Guide to Farmers’ Markets in Portland, Oregon

Eating Well Magazine rated the Portland Farmers Market one of the five best in the United States. What did they base their research on? A few things:

  • Variety of local foods
  • Number of workshops and demonstrations
  • Quality control
  • Focus on education
  • And more!

The Portland Farmers Market offers a bevy of markets Portlanders can visit to satisfy their cravings for fresh fare. From the Lents International Farmers Market in southeast to the market in historic Kenton in the northwest, the city and surrounding areas are awash in all that is fresh and edible!

Check out our latest infographic.  Keep in mind; these are not the only farmers markets in our area! We invite you to explore more and enjoy all our fair city has to offer.

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Keeping Food Safe from Farm to Fork

From livestock housing to food processing, storage and transportation, regulating humidity is critical to health and safety. Farmers rely on the proper conditions to keep their animals comfortable, safe, and productive. Food processing facilities use temporary climate control to eliminate condensation, which can carry dangerous contaminants that will make food unsafe to eat. Too much or too little humidity during the warehousing phase can mean significantly reduced shelf life and even total loss of food products. Lastly, transporting food products in environmentally controlled vehicles keeps your food safe to eat as it is transported to your local grocery store.  Infographic provided by Polygon.

Polygon_Food-Industry_Infographic_Feb-2015

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Temporary Climate Control, Helping the U.S. Food Industry Comply with Processing Standards

Take a trip back in time with our latest infographic documenting the inception of the U.S. food industry processing standards and how they have evolved to the regulations we know today. Explore the food inspection and regulation timeline, the growth of different food manufacturing industries, where the most processing plants are located, and how the presence of humidity in processing plants can negatively affect the end product. Temporary climate control is a powerful solution for all food processing plants, allowing plant managers to negate the effects of humidity and remain compliant with USDA standards.  Infographic provided by Polygon Group.

TCC_Food-Industry_Polygon_Nov2014

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Healthy Hydration

Healthy Hydration

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Drinking water is the healthiest way to hydrate.
Water is a macro-nutrient and is the only fluid we need to hydrate when following a healthy
lifestyle. Water contains zero sugar, calories, preservatives or additives; aids digestion and
metabolism; replenishes natural fluids depleted by other diuretic drinks; and is a key part of
the body’s cooling system.

Despite offering so many natural health advantages, the average Briton drinks just 200ml of
water a day – less than one glass of the 6-8 glasses of fluid the Food Standards Agency
(FSA) says we should be drinking daily.

As part of a healthy balanced lifestyle you may consume other drinks including milk, coffee,
tea, fruit juice, smoothies and fizzy drinks.

Drinking tea or coffee also delivers water, and contains caffeine, which can affect hydration
when consumed in above average quantities. Pregnant women are advised to consume no
more than 200mg or caffeine a day. This is equivalent to about two mugs of instant coffee or
about two and a half mugs of tea. Other hot drinks such as herbal teas, hot chocolates and
malted drinks can provide water, however if these drinks are sweetened with sugar it
increases the calorie content. The sugar also increases their potential to damage teeth if
good dental hygiene is not practiced.

Milk contains lots of essential nutrients such as protein, B vitamins and calcium, as well as
being a source of water. However, it can also contain saturated fat and so it’s a good idea for
adults and older children to choose semi-skimmed (less than 2% fat), 1% or skimmed milks.
For children between the ages of one and two years, the recommended milk is whole milk.
From two years onwards semi-skimmed milk can be introduced gradually. Skimmed and 1%
milks are not suitable for children until they are at least five years old because they have less
vitamin A and are lower in calories.

Fruit juices and smoothies may contain pureed fruit, which adds fibre and can also count
towards your 5-A-DAY. One 150ml glass of fruit juice counts as one portion, and smoothies
that contain at nleast 150ml of fruit juice and 80g crushed/pulped fruit count as two portions.
Because fruit juices and smoothies contain sugar (and therefore calories) and can be acidic,
they can potentially harm teeth.

Sugary Soft drinks contain sugar, which adds to your calorie intake and can potentially
damage teeth if the drinks are consumed frequently. It’s a good idea to limit consumption of
standard sugar containing soft drinks.

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2013 Halloween Spending –  Online Trading Academy

2013 Halloween Spending – Online Trading Academy

It’s a common opinion that Halloween is a spooky time of year, but the most chilling part of all?  The spending! When you add up the cost of candy, costumes, and cards, expenses can be more frightening than the most terrifying of horror movies.  Learn all about the Halloween economy and see how it compares financially to other national holidays in this scary infographic!

ota-halloween-spending

 

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